Add to the list!

Feb 21, 00:00 by John Frost
Anything else you believe should be part of a Post-apocalyptic list?
Mar 6, 22:51 by Christina Rivera
One book that might be added for consideration is I Who Have Never Known Men by Jacqueline Harpman. I seriously doubt it would warrant being "essential" as the post-apocolyptic setting is neither fully explained nor focused on extensively. It's a very character-centric novel and focuses on a young woman (a girl, really) who has no idea what happened to her world and has no memories of her life before waking in an underground bunker full of other women and guarded by speechless men.

A summary can be found on Amazon.com, and the edition I'm referring to was the mass market release from 1998. (No linking just in case it doesn't work).
Jul 22, 12:38 by Olivier Lessard Lavallée
I'd say Malevil, a french book by Robert Merle, this book started my post-apocalyptic frenzy and it kept me hooked for a while. It can be bough on amazon in english I think.

It tells the story of survivors of a "hot bomb" that burns everything with no radiation and that survive in a medieval castle protected by some mountains(that's not the exact word he used, but close to it). It is a MUST!!
Jul 22, 20:20 by James Morrison
Surely Robert O'Brien's classic Z for Zaccariah belongs on any such list? A marvellous YA novel about a girl who believes herself to be the sole survivor of a nuclear war--and when she discovers she's not, things actually get worse.
Jul 23, 08:18 by Bluejack
Oh, yes, I remember that story made quite an impression on me when I read it in my teens. Was that the first of the "last two people on earth" sub-genre?
Jul 25, 14:10 by v kayne
A wonderful story in the "last two people on earth" sub-genre is Mother to the World, by Richard Wilson; it was nominated for a Nebula, and may have won, in 1968.
Apr 18, 08:55 by Bill King
The Road, Cormac McCarthy (Knopf,2006)
Apr 18, 14:36 by Lois Tilton
Pulitzer Prize!
Jul 13, 18:11 by Danny Patric
Malevil also started my obsession with p-a books. I would be remiss not to mention that my favorite p-a story is The Man Who Walked Home by James Tiptree, Jr. Read it! It's easy to find.
Sep 6, 03:15 by Colin Unsworthy
A great survivalist book about surviving the effects of an electromagnetic pulse attack is William R. Forstchen's "One Second After", published by Tom Doherty Associates, LLC, copyright 2009
   

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