Dinosaurs in Science Fiction

May 21, 15:48 by John Frost
Comments on John Joseph Adams' newest bibliography.
May 21, 17:12 by Chris Dodson
Curse you, John Joseph Adams! Just when I get my reading list down to a somewhat manageable level, you come along and write this! ;-)

So much to read, so little time . . .
May 22, 04:29 by Steven Utley
Edgar Rice Burroughs must have loved dinosaurs, because they figure not only in his Land That Time Forgot but also in At the Earth's Core (1922) and its several sequels about Pellucidar, the primeval wilderness lying on the inner surface of the hollow Earth. In Tarzan the Terrible (1921), the Ape Man journeys to Pal-Ul-Don, which also does a brisk trade in prehistoric critters; dinosaurs provide incidental menace in Tarzan and the Forbidden City (1938), and The Eternal Lover (1925), which incidentally features Tarzan, offers further adventure in the same vein. Following Burroughs' lead, the more outre pulp magazines fairly swarmed with reptilian and other survivors from prehistoric times.

John Taine's The Greatest Adventure (1929) begins with the discovery of living dinosaurs in Antarctica -- but the creatures are more, or less, or in any case other than what they seem to be. In Taine's Before the Dawn (1934), present-day observers follow the career of a particular carnivorous dinosaur at the end of the Mesozoic Era.

An especially delightful tale in David Jablonski's Behold the Mighty Dinosaur anthology (New York: Elsevier/Nelson Books, 1981) is John Updike's "During the Jurassic."
Jun 5, 19:16 by Luc Reid
Just to nitpick, that's about 160 million years of existence for dinosauria rather than 140, unless you want to count birds (which wouldn't be a completely outlandish thing to do), in which case we have 225 million years for dinosaurs.

My son is seven, you see, and oh but we've learned a lot about dinosaurs.
Jun 6, 13:21 by Joe Tokamak
What is it about seven year old boys and dinosaurs? I remember it myself; enough that the recent revelation that the Tyrannosaurus Rex was a fairly feeble carrion eater rather than the king of the dinosaurs comes with a certain personal satisfaction: the Tricerotops was always my favorite, along with the one with a morning star for a tail. Ankylosaurus, maybe?
Jun 6, 21:27 by Camden
Ankylosaurus was the one with a kind of shell and long tail that ended like a kind of mace. A club with points kind of deal right? I'll check later, but I remember being a seven year old boy.
Jun 6, 21:29 by Camden
Yeah it was the one with the spiky shell and the club tail, neat. I mean that's not exactly my description, but it was what I was thinking.
Jun 7, 09:27 by Lavie Tidhar
Neal Asher's latest novel, Cowl, is a worthy addition to this list. It's only out in the UK at the moment (from Tor UK) but I assume a US edition will follow shortly. It is available from Amazon UK.
Jun 7, 19:18 by John Joseph Adams
Artistic rendering of an Ankylosaurus.

Use the Dinosaur Encyclopedia. There's a link to it in the article. Pretty cool, I think.

I wanted to actually make note of the most prominent dinosaur featured in each story and include a link directly to a picture of said dino, but it proved too collossal a task to attempt.

-JJA
Jan 23, 12:14 by Elizabeth Thomas
What is it about seven year old boys and dinosaurs?

I think it's just seven-year-olds in general. My sister and I had this huge tribe of plastic dinosaurs. She had this HUGE T-Rex that was awesome, but I've always been more a fan of the triceratops. There was one that I don't even know what it was anymore, but it was glow-in-the-dark and had some pretty nasty teeth.
   

Want to Post? Evil spammers have forced us to require login:

Sign In

Email:

Password:

 

NOTE: IRoSF no longer requires a 'username' -- why try to remember anything other than your own email address?

Not a subscriber? Subscribe now!

Problems logging in? Try our Problem Solver