The Rise and Fall of the Military Techno-Thriller

Nov 8, 00:54 by IROSF
Comment below!
Nov 16, 17:16 by Nader Elhefnawy
A minor correction: I should have said Richard Seaton, not Robert Seaton, when discussing the protagonist of the Skylark of Space (as pointed out to me by a reader off-site).
Nov 16, 22:32 by Lois Tilton
Glad to see someone else besides me does this.
Nov 23, 20:36 by Philip Kaldon
Excellent analysis of the techno-thriller, a genre that I spent much time reading in the 70s-90s. To the military techno-thriller, I'd add the biological techno-thrillers, such as Robin Cook and of course, Crichton's Andromeda Strain extends in that direction. Any number of plague and Ebola books and movies abound, often with military involvement. I was just watching the movie Outbreak on cable this weekend.

Dr. Phil
Nov 27, 14:26 by Nader Elhefnawy
Thanks for the comment.
The article grew out of my own long involvement with the genre.
As you correctly point out, military organizations were prominent in other types of high-tech thriller, like the biological thrillers you mention, though they were a bit outside of the area on which the article (already quite lengthy) focused. The prominence of military organizations in the biological thriller would seem only natural, given the degree of their involvement with both high-tech development (particularly in the U.S.) and disaster management-two subjects which had a big resurgence in movies during the '90s (in part, I suggested in an article back in January, because of some of the same changes that diminished the salience of the techno-thriller).
   

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